C. S. Lewis and the Bible

C-S-Lewis narniaI wrote a two-part series on this blog called “Narnia: Growing Up,” in which I expose the occult nature of C. S. Lewis’s fantasy series The Chronicles of Narnia. Go here and here to read it. In the pages below, I discuss Lewis’s unorthodox (heterodox, heretical) views on the Bible, as he explained them in his non-fiction writings.

Robert Lotzer argues that “rather than seeing Lewis as a theologian with a low view of Scripture,” we should see him “as a creative author pointing beyond himself to the Reality which is desperately longed for” (par. 54). Michael Christensen, however, believes that “Lewis holds by faith a high view of Scripture” (92). He argues that one’s desire for “an infallible authority, divine in nature, absolute in certainty, and eternal in duration which will serve as a final measure or reference point of truth” amounts to “deny[ing]” the “humanness” of Scripture and implicitly calls this desire bibliolatry (94).

However, based on the evidence cited and analyzed above, I “see Lewis as a theologian with a low view of Scripture” (Lotzer par. 54). Contra Lewis, all Scripture is verbally inspired, historical truth. The Bible is “an infallible authority, divine in nature, absolute in certainty, and eternal in duration which will serve as a final measure or reference point of truth” (Christensen 94). It “gives true answers to all the questions” that a Christian “who reads it in the right spirit . . . might ask” (Lewis, “To Clyde,” 1046). Biblical inspiration and inerrancy matter, now more than ever.

Sources Cited
Christensen, Michael J. C. S. Lewis on Scripture: His Thoughts on the Nature of Biblical Inspiration, the Role of Revelation, and the Question of Errancy. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1989, 2002.
Lewis, C. S. “To Clyde S. Kilby.” 7 May 1959. The Collected Letters of C. S. Lewis, Volume 3: Narnia, Cambridge, and Joy, 1950-1963. Ed. Walter Hooper. San Francisco: HarperCollins, 2007. 1044-46.
Lotzer, Robert A. “Calvin and Lewis on the Nature of Scripture.” 54 pars. 9 May 1997.